Guidance and support around Coronavirus. St Helens and District is currently operating under the "Bringing everyone back together safely framework" we are currently at a Readiness Level of Red. We not are allowing face to face meetings, in line with the National Youth Agency guidance. However, our leaders are working remotely to provide all essential services. Read more here

Beaver Scouts

‘The best thing we did was swim in the rain. I wasn’t even sure we were allowed to, but it was brilliant! I mean we were wet anyway, so I guess it didn’t matter too much about the weather.’

Beavers are our youngest members, and generally meet for an hour per week. They enjoy all that Scouting has to offer; being introduced to outdoor activities, having the opportunity to be creative, explore their local community and experience the excitement of a Beaver Scout sleepover with their friends.

The Beaver Colony is the first and youngest section of the Scout Group. Beaver Scouts are young people aged between 6 and 8 years old. There is core flexibility in the age range: young people can join from age 5½, and can move to Cubs between age 7½ and 8½. It may sometimes be appropriate to extend this flexibility for young people with additional needs. For further information, see our guidance on age range flexibility.
Find a Beaver Colony near you.

Structure

A Beaver Colony may be organised into smaller groups called Lodges. Lodges can be used in a number of ways to facilitate the organisation of the Beaver Scout Colony. They may provide a ‘home’ area for Beaver Scouts to gather at points at the start, during or at the end of the Colony meeting.

Activities

During their time in the Colony, Beaver Scouts will get a chance to try a wide range of different activities as well as going on trips, days out, and on sleepovers. Participation, rather than meeting set standards, is the key approach, and there are a range of badges and challenge awards that Beaver Scouts can gain to recognise their achievements.

Further information about badges and awards for the Beaver section can be found here.

The Beaver Scout Promise

The traditional Beaver Scout Promise is:

I promise to do my best, to be kind and helpful and to love God.

However there are a number of variations of the Beaver Scout Promise to reflect the range of faiths, beliefs and attitudes, and nationalities, in the UK within Scouting. For alternative variations of the Beaver Promise please download our Promise guide.

The Beaver Scout Law

There is no formal Beaver Scout Law. The concepts expressed in the Scout Law are to be presented to Beaver Scouts through games, storytelling and other informal activities.

CLICK ON THE LINK BELOW TO DOWNLOAD A COMPLETE PARENTS GUIDE TO BEAVERS SCOUTS

What do Beavers wear?

Beaver uniform consists of a blue sweatshirt with your badges sewn on and a coloured scarf or ‘necker’ to represent your local group. There are lots of other optional accessories you can wear such as hats, hoodies, navy blue trousers or shorts, if you’d like to.

Why is uniform important?

Wearing a uniform is comfy and practical. It means you can run around and get messy without ruining your other clothes. It makes you feel part of a team. It means no one feels uncomfortable or left out. And it gives you a place to show off all the brilliant badges you earn.

Where can I buy it?

Uniform can either be bought from our online shop – Scout Store. or from a local supplier. If you’re stuck, ask adult volunteers to tell you more about what to buy and where to buy it. If cost is an issue, they will be more than happy to help.

Badges

Is your child being invested as a Beaver, Cub, Scout or Explorer? Are you unsure where the badges have to be placed on uniform?
– We’ve got the solution for you: find out where all the badges go!

Put your phone down and what are you left with? Just teamwork, courage and the skills to succeed.’
Bear Grylls, Chief Scout Bear Grylls